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Headplay personal cinema system.No document with DOI “10.1.1.1073.2221”

 

Headplay personal cinema system.HEADPLAY Personal Cinema System

 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 

International Journal of Pediatrics.HEADPLAY Personal Cinema System | [H]ard|Forum

 

Three straps securely hold the HeadPlay in place while at the same time blocking light coming in from the outside. The end result is a cinematic experience that is sure to impress. This headset is a great choice for FPV pilots that struggle to find a traditional FPV goggle that meets their Interpupillary distance (IPD). Mar 01,  · Now you can get all this plus additional cutting-edge technology from HEADPLAY with the world’s first “personal cinema system.” Headplay PCS is the next frontier in portable entertainment. Your HEADPLAY™ Personal Cinema System is a portable visual headset and multi-media center delivering a comfortable, immersive, high-resolution, cinematic viewing experience for gaming, movie watching and internet use. It is versatile, convenient and gives you .

 

Headplay personal cinema system.CiteSeerX — Document Not Found

Three straps securely hold the HeadPlay in place while at the same time blocking light coming in from the outside. The end result is a cinematic experience that is sure to impress. This headset is a great choice for FPV pilots that struggle to find a traditional FPV goggle that meets their Interpupillary distance (IPD). The Headplay Personal Cinema System is the future of personal displays. Utilizing a revolutionary ergonomic design and proprietary optical technology break-throughs, via a single LCOS display, the Personal Cinema System delivers an immersive big screen viewing experience you can get lost in for hours. Simply Plug n Play With. Your HEADPLAY™ Personal Cinema System is a portable visual headset and multi-media center delivering a comfortable, immersive, high-resolution, cinematic viewing experience for gaming, movie watching and internet use. It is versatile, convenient and gives you .
 
 
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Headplay Personal Cinema System
Includes cutting-edge goggles attached to an adjustable visor
Headplay Personal Cinema System | Technogog

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EMLA local anaesthetic cream was used to reduce the pain associated with intravenous cannulation. Children were asked to rate their anxiety, pain, and satisfaction scores after intravenous cannulation. There were no statistically significant differences in terms of pain and anxiety scores between the 2 groups. Intravenous cannulation without inducing anxiety or pain in the awake child is desirable but not always attainable even with topical anaesthetics applied.

Even if the topical anaesthetic is completely effective, it may not necessarily remove anticipated anxiety associated with what is normally deemed a painful procedure. For children undergoing surgery, anaesthetic induction appears to be the greatest stressor in the perioperative period [ 1 ]. While mask induction may seem the less traumatic choice, it is well observed amongst paediatric anaesthetists that mask phobia exists in as much as needle phobia does [ 4 ].

Age appropriate distraction therapy tools are usually employed during this process. We sought to study if HEADPLAY PCS was as effective as conventional therapy used at our institution for facilitating the insertion of an intravenous cannula in children undergoing intravenous induction. It may be used for gaming, movie watching, and internet use.

It has the potential to be a powerful tool in alleviating preoperative anxiety for medical procedures such as intravenous cannulation. For this study, we used it for movie viewing. This was a prospective randomised controlled trial involving 60 children.

The inclusion criteria included any ASA I-III child between the age of 5 and 15 years who was able to understand what the study entailed. The child should also have not been administered with any painkiller or premedication within the previous 24 hours. Exclusion criteria included children who were allergic to EMLA, ASA IV patients, those with an indwelling cannula in place, and those with heads that could not accommodate the visor.

Recruitment was conducted entirely by anaesthetists who were the investigators of this study. To aid recruitment, all children were allowed to use the HEADPLAY PCS device for a minute in the holding area outside the operating theatre Figure 1 , but it was made clear to the child and parents that consequent to randomization, the child may not have the opportunity to use the device during the first intravenous cannulation attempt.

The conventional method of distraction therapy used in our institution was also explained to both the parent and child to facilitate them making an informed decision about whether to participate in the study. The 60 children were randomized into 2 groups of 30 each using a computer-generated random table. Group 2 had conventional methods of distraction used during intravenous cannula insertion.

This would include verbal distraction, bubble play, or choosing stickers. After preoperative screening, all eligible cases for the study were approached and parental consent was obtained. Assent was obtained from the child. The child was then taken into the operating theatre OT. Concurrently, his anxiety was assessed by the same anaesthetic nurse using mYPAS. The intravenous cannula was inserted by the investigator who is an experienced anaesthetist. The child was assessed with the mYPAS score during the cannulation process by the same anaesthetic nurse who had assessed the child before.

The child was asked to report on pain and satisfaction with the overall process after the first intravenous cannulation attempt was made, whether it was successful or not. The child was also assessed by the nurse with regard to cooperation during the cannulation attempt.

If the first attempt at cannulation failed, the child was not assessed further for pain and anxiety although further attempts at cannulation may have been made with a distraction technique chosen by the child. If the child rejected the HEADPLAY PCS device half way through, this was regarded as a failure under the study group but assessment of the child would still continue with the alternative standard distraction therapy.

All data was analyzed using SPSS Parametric patient demographics such as age and satisfaction score were analyzed using -test. Anxiety scores and pain scores within groups were analyzed using independent sample Wilcoxon rank-sum Mann-Whitney test. Spearman correlation was used to analyze the association between pain and satisfaction rate.

A value of less than 0. Patient demographics are summarized in Table 1. There were no statistically significant differences between the 2 groups. The remaining one in each group elected to enter the operating theatre alone. The majority of children recruited were Chinese or Malay boys with no previous intravenous cannulation experience. Of those who had previous intravenous cannulation, none of them had cried during the cannulation process.

Table 2 summarizes the anxiety scores of children obtained from self-assessment, parental observation and using the mYPAS score. The increase in anxiety levels between each location for each child was also not statistically significant. Pain scores at the holding area were negligible for both groups. These differences did not reach statistical significance.

There was not always a correlation between liking the device and wanting to use it again. One child who liked the device and found it comfortable did not want to use it again.

Conversely, two children who did not like the device wanted to use it again for their next intravenous cannulation. Three children who did not like the device and did not want to use it again found the device uncomfortable; of these, two had significant pain scores associated with intravenous cannulation of more than 4.

Medical procedures and surgery are sources of pain and anxiety for patients. In children undergoing surgery, preoperative anxiety can translate into negative physiological and behavioural responses that persist into the postoperative period such as crying, sleep disturbance, separation anxiety, and increased postoperative pain [ 5 , 6 ].

The degree of preoperative anxiety can depend on the age and personality of the child [ 2 ] and the environmental set-up of the holding room and the operating theatre. Systematic reviews of the use of psychological interventions in children undergoing needle-related procedures like routine childhood immunization suggest that breathing exercises, child-directed distraction, nurse-led distraction, and combined cognitive-behavioural interventions such as hypnosis appear effective in reducing the pain and distress associated with needle procedures [ 15 , 16 ].

Similarly, music therapy holds promise as an adjuvant therapy to aid the reduction of pain and anxiety in children undergoing medical procedures [ 17 ]. The successful use of these different methods is often dependent on patient preference and receptivity towards a particular therapy and the person administering the therapy.

Our results suggest that its use is comparable to our current distraction techniques that employ bubbles, stickers, and verbal reassurance, in terms of anxiety, pain, and satisfaction incurred during the procedure.

This study had not been powered to detect significant differences in terms of anxiety and pain scores but satisfaction. Dissatisfaction with the intravenous cannulation process in most cases was secondary to pain due to ineffectiveness of EMLA rather than the device per se; there was only one instance where the patient had low pain scores of less than 5 after intravenous cannulation but was dissatisfied because he found the device uncomfortable.

EMLA is known to be rather ineffective as a topical anaesthetic. However, in our institution, EMLA is the only topical anaesthetic currently available to facilitate painless venipuncture and intravenous cannulation. In this study, we did not have a control group in which no distraction method was employed during the intravenous cannulation process. Satisfaction scores may well have been much lower if no distraction therapy had been employed at all.

Cooperation with the intravenous cannulation was high in both groups with rates of Cooperation was lost when pain was encountered during intravenous cannulation. In our study, most of the children were Chinese and Malay boys with a mean age of 9 years.

The fewer girls recruited in this study are a reflection of the gender disparity apparent in the study population amongst which these patients were recruited, that is, day surgery patients, the majority of whom were boys.

Results from our study should therefore be interpreted in this light. We cannot conclude that there is a gender preference for this device. Children below the age of 5 years are less accepting this device. As such, our study recruited children only above the age of 5 years. This has the potential to allow for an immersive environment for more effective distraction but to some children, particularly those with claustrophobia, this may be a scary prospect.

Hence, not every child will want to use this device. Unlike PediSedate which also uses a headset to administer nitrous oxide in oxygen through a nosepiece used in combination with an interactive video component [ 19 ], HEADPLAY PCS cannot be modified to deliver nitrous oxide which would aid with pain reduction during invasive procedures but it may be used concomitantly for an inhalational induction if the child prefers. There are other studies, however, that have not associated near work with myopia or the development of myopia [ 21 , 22 ].

In this study, we could not demonstrate that HEADPLAY PCS is superior to the conventional distraction therapy that we employ during intravenous cannulation in children undergoing intravenous induction. Based on our study, we cannot justify recommendations to use it routinely as part of clinical practice. However, given the diverse paediatric patient spectrum, HEADPLAY PCS may be preferred over other means of distraction therapy by some children and add to the overall satisfaction with a medical procedure that is short in duration and associated with pain that may be controlled with simple analgesics or local anaesthetics.

This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License , which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited. Journal overview. Special Issues. Academic Editor: Lavjay Butani. Received 28 Mar Accepted 16 May Published 11 Jun Introduction Intravenous cannulation without inducing anxiety or pain in the awake child is desirable but not always attainable even with topical anaesthetics applied.

Figure 1. Figure 2. Table 1. Table 2. Table 3. Acceptance Frequency Percentage Did the child like the device? Table 4. References Z. Kain, L. Mayes, T. O’Connor, and D. View at: Google Scholar A. Watson and A.

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